From a crisis to a golden age

After every period of major crisis there comes a time of dynamic change. In these times, it's possible to reimagine everything. In these times, it's possible for visionaries to lead the way to what's next.

In the UK, the NHS itself could only really have been created in the wake of the most horrific war. At any other time cynics, or those politically opposed to social care, could have killed the plan on the basis of cost or complexity. But in the dynamic times of the post-war years, as Britain remade itself after crisis, visionary leaders were able to build the momentum to realise such big ideas.

Similarly, after the Great Depression in the US, President Roosevelt was able to create radical Federal programmes under the New Deal that couldn't have been achieved at any other time.

And so it is now.

The world is starting the slow process of recovering from the worst impacts of the global pandemic, although it's a while before we'll be fully past it. We are going to have years of dynamic change ahead of us. There are massive problems to overcome both now and in our future. But, because of that, I'm convinced we're about to enter a golden age for agencies.

That's because it's times like these when clients need us most — to help them explore the new dynamic landscape and guide them to new opportunities. Most organisations are boxy and square with hard edges. They struggle to interface with the zigzag, wibbly wobbly chaos of the world, with all its changes in technology, in culture, in the economy, in market demand and more.

But seeing, and adapting to, these changes is what agencies are for. Over the years gencies have helped them get to grips with display ads, direct mail, telemarketing, PR, digital, social, SEO, events and much much more. Agencies are the guides to new territories, helping clients explore and learn.

But to succeed in this golden age, agencies are going to need visionary leadership. They'll need to see what's coming first, and understand it. They'll need to be very well briefed.


Photo by John Moeses Bauan on Unsplash

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